Teaching Assistant

Being A Teaching Assistant

Teaching Assistants (TAs) are important and valued components of The Upledger Institute International teaching team. As a TA, you work closely with class Instructors and Facilitators to portray therapeutic concepts and techniques that are growing ever more critical to the good health of people from all walks of life. Being a Teaching Assistant is also an important part of learning to be a better therapist.

CST Teaching Assistant Qualifications

CranioSacral Therapy & SomatoEmotional Release

All Teaching Assistants should have the legal license to practice in their locale, as required by their local licensing agency.

CranioSacral Therapy 1 TA:

  • Successful attendance at a SomatoEmotional Release 1 Workshop.

CranioSacral Therapy 2 TA:

  • Satisfactory assistance in two CranioSacral Therapy 1 classes.
  • Written recommendation from an Instructor or Certified CS Teaching Assistant

CranioSacral Therapy for Pediatrics TA:

  • Successful attendance at a CranioSacral for Pediatrics workshop.
  • Satisfactory assistance at a SomatoEmotional Release 1 workshop.
  • Written Recommendation from an Instructor.

SomatoEmotional Release 1 TA:

  • Satisfactory assistance in two CranioSacral Therapy 2 classes.
  • Written recommendation from an Instructor.

All Other UII CS Courses:

  • Subject to Instructor recommendation, and may require additional qualification/s; such as repeating the course, certification, and/or being qualified to assist one or more additional class types.

CERTIFIED Teaching Assistant

  • Successful assistance at 4 CranioSacral Therapy 1 classes.
  • Successful assistance at 4 CranioSacral Therapy 2 classes.
  • Successful assistance at 2 SomatoEmotional Release 1 classes.
  • Successful assistance at a SomatoEmotional Release 2 workshop.
  • Certification at the Techniques or Diplomate Level of CranioSacral Therapy.
    You can substitute 24 hours of being mentored for either a CS1 or a CS2 Teaching Assistant requirement.

Barral Curriculum Teaching Assistant Qualifications

VM1: Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 1 (VM1) TA:
  • Successful attendance at two Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 1 (VM1) workshops.
    In certain situations, attending the VM1 for the second time may be substituted by attending a sanctioned VM1 study group or attending Listening Techniques.
  • Successful attendance at one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 2 (VM2) workshop.
  • Successful attendance at one Visceral Manipulation: The Pelvis (VM3) workshop OR
  • Successful attendance at one Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation Instructor.
VM2: Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 2 (VM2) TA:
  • Successful attendance at two Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 2 (VM2) workshops.
    In certain situations, attending the VM2 for the second time may be substituted by attending a sanctioned VM2 study group or attending Listening Techniques.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 1 (VM1) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation Instructor.
VM3: Visceral Manipulation: The Pelvis (VM3) TA:
  • Successful attendance at two Visceral Manipulation: The Pelvis (VM3) workshops.
    In certain situations, attending the VM3 for the second time may be substituted by attending a sanctioned VM3 study group or attending Listening Techniques.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 2 (VM2) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation Instructor.
VM4: Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) TA:
  • Successful attendance at two Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) workshops.
    In certain situations, attending the VM4 for the second time may be substituted by attending a sanctioned VM4 study group or attending Listening Techniques.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 2 (VM2) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation Instructor.
VM5: Manual Thermal Evaluation and Introduction to VisceroEmotional (VM5) TA:
  • Successful attendance at one VisceroEmotional Relationships (VM6) workshop.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 2 (VM2) workshop.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Pelvis (VM3) workshop OR
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation 5 Instructor.
VM6: VisceroEmotional Relationships (VM6) TA:
  • Successful attendance at one VisceroEmotional Relationships (VM6) workshops.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Pelvis (VM3) workshop OR
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) workshop.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Manual Thermal Evaluation and Introduction to VisceroEmotional (VM5) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation 6 Instructor.
VAP: Visceral Manipulation: Applications for Pediatrics (VAP) TA:
  • Successful attendance at one Visceral Manipulation: The Pelvis (VM3) workshop.
  • Successful attendance at one Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) workshop.
  • Successful attendance at one Visceral Manipulation: Applications for Pediatrics (VAP) workshop.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 1 (VM1) workshop.
  • Experience working with pediatrics.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation VAP Instructor.
LT1: Listening Techniques 1 (LT1) TA:
  • Manual Thermal Evaluation and Introduction to VisceroEmotional (VM5) TA
  • Successful attendance at one Listening Techniques 1 (LT1) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a LT Instructor.
LT2: Listening Techniques 2 (LT2):
  • Successful attendance at two Listening Techniques 2 (LT2) workshops
  • Successful attendance at one Listening Techniques 1 (LT1) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a LT Instructor.
VMD: Visceral Manipulation Dissection (VMD):
  • Successful attendance at two Visceral Manipulation Dissection (VMD) workshops.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Strategic Visceral Manipulation Dissection (VMD) Instructor.
VMAP: Advanced Components of the Abdomen and Pelvis (VMAP):
  • Successful attendance at two Advanced Components of the Abdomen and Pelvis (VMAP) workshops.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen1 (VM1).
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation VMAP Instructor.
VMAT: Advanced Visceral Components of the Neck and Thorax (VMAT):
  • Successful attendance at two Advanced Visceral Components of the Neck and Thorax (VMAT) workshops.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation VMAT Instructor.

VNAC: Visceral, Neural and Articular Advanced Clinical Synthesis (VNAC):

  • Successful attendance at two Visceral, Neural and Articular Advanced Clinical Synthesis (VNAC) workshops.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Pelvis (VM3) workshop. OR
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) workshop.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerves; Upper Body (NM2) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation VNAC Instructor.
NM1: Neural Manipulation: Neuromeningeal Manipulation (NM1) TA:
  • Successful attendance at two Neural Manipulation: Neuromeningeal Manipulation (NM1) workshops.
  • Successful attendance at one Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerve Manipulation: Upper Body (NM2) workshop OR
  • Successful attendance at one Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerve Manipulation: Lower Body (NM3) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Neural Manipulation Instructor.

NM2: Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerve Manipulation: Upper Body (NM2) TA:
NM3: Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerve Manipulation: Lower Body (NM3) TA:

  • Successful attendance at one Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerve Manipulation: Upper Body (NM2) workshop.
  • Successful attendance at one Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerve Manipulation: Lower Body (NM3) workshop.
  • Successful assistance at one Neural Manipulation: Neuromeningeal Manipulation (NM1) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Neural Manipulation Instructor.
NM4: Neural Manipulation: Brain and Cranial Nerve Manipulation (NM4) TA:
  • Successful attendance at one Neural Manipulation: Brain and Cranial Nerve Manipulation (NM4) workshops.
  • Successful assistance at one Neural Manipulation: Neuromeningeal Manipulation (NM1) workshop.
  • Successful assistance at one Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerve Manipulation: Upper Body (NM2) workshop.
  • Successful assistance at one Neural Manipulation: Peripheral Nerve Manipulation: Lower Body (NM3) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Neural Manipulation Instructor.
NVMTA: Neural Manipulation: Neuro-Visceral Manipulation of the Thorax and Abdomen (NVMTA):
  • Successful attendance at two Visceral, Neural and Articular Advanced Clinical Synthesis (NVMTA) workshops.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Pelvis (VM3) workshop OR
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: The Thorax (VM4) workshop.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Neural Manipulation: Neuromeningeal Manipulation; An Integrative Approach to Trauma (NM1) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation NVMTA Instructor.
MALE: Manual Articular Approach: Lower Extremity (MALE):
  • Successful attendance at two Manual Articular Approach: Lower Extremity (MALE) workshops.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation MALE Instructor.
MAUE: Manual Articular Approach: Upper Extremity (MAUE):
  • Successful attendance at two Manual Articular Approach: Upper Extremity (MAUE) workshops.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation MAUE Instructor.

MASP: Manual Articular Approach: Spine and Pelvis (MASP):

  • Successful attendance at two Manual Articular Approach: Spine and Pelvis (MASP) workshops.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation MASP Instructor.
VVML: Visceral Vascular Manipulation: Lower Body (VVML):
  • Successful attendance at two Visceral Vascular Manipulation: Lower Body (VVML) workshops.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 2 (VM2) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation VVML Instructor.
VVMU: Visceral Vascular Manipulation: Upper Body (VVMU):
  • Successful attendance at two Visceral Vascular Manipulation: Upper Body (VVMU) workshops.
  • Satisfactory assistance in one Visceral Manipulation: Abdomen 2 (VM2) workshop.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Visceral Manipulation VVMU Instructor.
SCB1: Strategic Crossroads of the Body 1 (SCB1):
  • Successful attendance at two Strategic Crossroads of the Body 1 (SCB1) workshops.
  • Recommendation from a Certified Strategic Crossroads of the Body 1 (SCB1) Instructor.

TA Program Details

To help make each workshop successful and enjoyable for all involved, the following TA guidelines have been developed based on evaluations received over the years from participants, instructors and facilitators. The objective is always to create a safe, supportive environment for each student’s growth and education. Remember, we are working as a team. The better the assistants and instructor work as a unit, the better the class will run.
  • Instructors are in charge of the course and Facilitators are in charge of the overall seminar.
  • Meet with your workshop Instructor prior to the beginning of the first day of class.
  • On the first day, be a little early to meet the Facilitator and socialize with participants during registration.
  • Before class begins, make sure you know how the lights and temperature controls work and where the bathrooms are located. The following days, be on time.
  • Avoid side conversations during lectures.
  • Very important: Do not treat anyone, especially another TA, at any time during class days. You must abide by this rule for liability reasons. If you have your hands on a participant during a practice session for more than a couple of minutes, you are treating, not assisting. This is a disservice to all participants.
  • Although there is no strict dress code, keep in mind that you are representing The Upledger Institute International. Dress comfortably yet professionally, and please avoid wearing dangling necklaces and bracelets while assisting participants.
  • When assisting, use the same hand positions that are used by the Instructor. Variations tend to confuse participants. If you have a differing opinion, discuss it privately with the Instructor during a break as it is very disruptive to debate techniques in front of class participants.
  • Be aware of your personal hygiene and avoid disturbing others with strong or offensive odors. Breath mints are recommended, especially after lunch or if you smoke. Remember many people are highly allergic to perfumes (even essences) and while we ask that you wear deodorant, refrain from those that are heavily scented.
  • Make yourself available – the most frequent complaint we hear is that it is difficult to get a TAs attention. Divide the room up and circulate as much as possible, attempting to anticipate problems. Do not spend more than a few minutes at a table at any one time.
  • You may be requested to act as a table partner if there is an odd number of peope in attendance. Please do so when needed and alternate with the other TAs.
  • If you find you are answering the same question repeatedly, or you see several participants having difficulty applying a certain technique, please tell the instructor so that the issue can be addressed with the whole class. Also, if a student is asking an important or interesting question, you may suggest that he/she ask the instructor so that the entire class can benefit from the answer.
  • Positive reinforcement is very important. Tell participants what they are doing correctly and when they’ve got it right. Praise is the best learning motivator.
  • If you have advanced questions, see the instructor at the break or after class.
  • If you have any suggestions about these guidelines, the class, the meeting site, or products, please give a note to the facilitator. You are our experts in the field and we value your input.
  • Please refrain from selling your own inventory items when assisting.
  • At the end of the class, you will be asked to fill out a form that globally evaluates student skills. You only need to evaluate “extreme” students: those who are really good, or those who are really having trouble.
  • You will also be evaluated by the instructor, participants, facilitator and fellow TAs. These evaluations will be used to determine your progression as a TA.

The score scale is:
5=excellent; 4=very good; 3=good; 2=fair; 1=poor.

Evaluation scores are averaged. To progress as an assistant, you need an average score of 4.0 or better from the instructor, participant and facilitator evaluations. To become a certified teaching assistant, you will need average scores of 4.5 or better from the participant evaluations and 4.0 or better from the instructor, TA and facilitator evaluations from each TA assignment. TA certification status will be reviewed annually.

Maintaining TA Status

It is crucial that the information conveyed by Instructors and TAs be timely and consistent. To ensure this level of quality information, you must TA at least once every 3 years. If there is a lapse of three or more years, you may be required to review or attend another course before assisting again.

TA certification status is reviewed annually. You must assist at least once each year with satisfactory scores to maintain certification.

Scheduling an Assignment

TA assignments are given primarily on a first come, first served basis.

If you are unable to keep your scheduled assignment, notify us at least 60 days in advance of the class.

Three cancellations of confirmed assignments with less than 60 days notice, within a 12-month period, may subject you to a suspension of up to one year. During that time you will not be assigned to assist any classes, permitted to schedule a TA assignment, nor be listed as a TA in any UII publication. Following this period you will be required to reapply to the TA program.

Benefits 
  • Networking
  • Hearing the course material again, perhaps with a different instructor
  • Become known as a specialist in your area for clinical referrals
  • Be listed as a Teaching Assistant on iahp.com
  • Helping teach as a teaching assistant makes you a better therapist; TO TEACH IS TO LEARN

Teaching Assistants in Singapore receive: 

  • $150 cash for assisting at a four-day workshop and $25/per diem. Overseas TA will receive $250 towards their travel expenses.
  • $100 tuition voucher towards any class held in Singapore. Valid for 1 year.
Registration Incentive Program 

We value your help in referring other healthcare practitioners to our continuing-education classes.

  • For each referral registered in an introductory-level workshop (CS1, VM1, NM1, LDT1 classes) you will receive 10% referral tuition voucher or 5% cash.
  • Tuition vouchers are given after the completion of the class.

In order to receive credit for a referral, you must be registered as a Promotional Sponsor and the applicant MUST mention your name when registering for the class.  

Please contact us for TA assignments.

Why Repeating Seminars Makes You a Better Therapist.
Why Participating in Study Groups and Practice Groups Makes you an Even Better Therapist.

The Learning Pyramid was developed way back in the 1960s by the NTL Institute in Bethel, Maine. To summarize the numbers (which sometimes get cited differently) learners retain approximately:

  • 5% of what you learn when you’ve learned from lecture.
  • 10% of what you learn when you’ve learned from reading.
  • 20% of what you learn from audio-visual.
  • 30% of what you learn when you see a demonstration.
  • 50% of what you learn when engaged in a group discussion.
  • 75% of what you learn when you practice what you learned.
  • 90% of what you learn when you teach someone else or use it immediately.

So why do you retain 90% when you teach someone else or when you implement it immediately? When you implement or teach, you instantly make mistakes. As soon as you run into difficulty and start to make mistakes, you have to learn how to correct the mistake. This forces your brain to concentrate.

But surely your brain is concentrating in a lecture or while reading? It is, but it’s not making any mistakes. What your brain hears or sees is simply an abstract concept. And no matter how clearly the steps are outlined, your brain does not retain a large amount of the information. There are two reasons why.

Reason 1: Your brain gets stuck at the first obstacle.

To prove this, pick up a book and read it for about 10 minutes. Now go back and re-read it, and you’ll find you’ve missed a few of the concepts in just the first few minutes. It’s hard to believe, but as you keep reading the same chapter over and over, you’ll find more things that you’ve missed.

This is because the brain gets stuck at the first new concept or obstacle. It stops and tries to apply the concept but struggles to do so. But you continue to read the book. The brain got stuck at the first point, but more points keep coming.

Reason 2: Your brain needs to make the mistake first hand

No matter how good the explanation, you will not get all of it right the first time. You must make the mistake. And this is because your interpretation varies from the writer or speaker. You think you’ve heard or read what you’ve heard or read. But the reality is different. You’ve only interpreted what they’ve said, and more often than not, the interpretation is not quite correct. You can only find out how much off the mark you are by trying to implement or teach the concept.

So how to work to retain 90% of what you’ve learned?

Write things down, discuss them, practice them, review them, over and over (correctly!)

Four Stages for Learning Any New Skill

The theory was developed at the Gordon Training International in the 1970s. The Four Stages of Learning provides a model for learning. It suggests that individuals are initially unaware of how little they know, or unconscious of their incompetence. As they recognize their incompetence, they consciously acquire a skill, then consciously use that skill. Eventually, the skill can be done without consciously being thought through, and the individual is said to have unconscious competence.

(1) Unconscious Incompetence

This is where ‘you don’t know what you don’t know.’ You do not understand or know how to do something and do not necessarily recognize the deficit. You must recognize your own incompetence, and the value of the new skill, before moving on to the next stage. You are in this stage before you have started studying a new modality.

(2) Conscious Incompetence

In this stage you do not understand or know how to do something, but now you recognize the deficit, as well as the value of a new skill in addressing the deficit. You attend a new modality seminar, and see a whole new world of evaluation and treatment. The making of mistakes can be integral to the learning process at this stage.

(3) Conscious Competence

You have been practicing what you learned in the seminar and are able to apply much of the information. You are able to recall things, or know where to look them up in your textbook or study guide. You understand how to do something; however, demonstrating the skill or knowledge requires concentration.

(4) Unconscious Competence

This is the level you when you have had so much practice with a skill that it has become “second nature” and can be performed easily. As a result, the skill can be performed while executing another task. You have created strong
enough cellular memories that you know and understand without having to consciously search your brain for the information. This is the level to strive for to become an excellent therapist.

The fastest way to reach Unconscious Competence is to repeat the seminars, and participate in Study or Practice Groups so you can review the evaluation and treatment techniques correctly!

Designed by IT Wonders Singapore.